Camilo Bojacá explores the relationship between architecture, nature and landscape

By CARLOS PINTO

 

Camilo Bojacá’s (1985, Colombia) surrealist work explores the relationship between architecture, nature and landscape to conceived detailed renderings of mankind’s seemly dichotomic relationship with its habitat. In his creations, scale and other structural elements, both in the physical and abstract senses, are thought on the basis of draftsmanship language.

His images habitually accentuate political connotations directed at reflecting and subverting reality as we know and experience it in the form of visual statements about contemporary society.

Drawing upon iconographies of the human body in parallelism with construction sites, skyscrapers and natural landscapes elements (like flowers, trees, hills…) the artist brings a critical understanding to the vulnerabilities of the structures imposed by the city for the subjection of its inhabitants.

While the aesthetics of Bojacá’s work prevails a magical serenity resting on the two- dimensional surface of the white sheet, it’s drawn elements still pertain an awareness to the problems of the same, to make a comment, a remark or simply to question the image’s power to affects its viewers with new possibilities, histories and experiences.

 

Top image: Camilo Bojacá next to his work Wound on the ground, 2016. Japanese ink and watercolor, 200 x 150 cm (detail). ENQUIRY

CAMILO BOJACÁ, Untitled, 2017. Graphite mine structure, 20 x 35 x 36,5 cm
CAMILO BOJACÁ, Untitled I, 2016. Charcoal and Japanese ink on hygrometer paper, 30 x 42 cm
CAMILO BOJACÁ, Untitled III, 2016. Charcoal and Japanese ink on hygrometer paper, 30 x 42 cm